Category Archives: K

Turasan Kalecik Karası 2015

This Turasan Kalecik Karası 2015 was part of a shipment of wines I got from Turasan a while back. Kalecik Karası was the first wine made out of native Turkish grapes that I really liked and while I’ve come to love what Turkey does with international grapes more, I still try a new one from time to time.

Turasan is possibly one of the most well known wineries in Turkey. Certainly the most well known in Cappadocia. The winery produces a wide range of styles, grapes, and quality levels. I’ve mostly only had the wines from the low and mid price ranges but would really like to try some of the higher end wines soon. One of the things I love about Turasan is their Emir. Not a lot of wineries in Turkey produce Emir wines which makes Turasan’s extra special.

Turasan Kalecik Karası

On its own, for me, the Turasan Kalecik Karası was a little bit of a disappointing drinking experience. While it might not have been my favorite stand along drinking wine; it was a great food wine. It did go pretty well with our dinner of cold pasta salad with grilled vegetables, Greek pork sausage, and white cheese. Not all bad, and cheap (only about 25 TL directly from Turasan).

Turasan Kalecik Karası

Turasan Kalecik Karası 2015 Tasting Notes:

This is a pretty standard Kalecik Karası in the nose with aromas of red berries and candy. The palate is berries, licorice, and black pepper. Fairly well balanced but with something of a cliffhanger finish. One minute it’s there but the next it’s gone.

In the end the Turasan Kalecik Karası is a simple wine that isn’t going going your palate. Also nice drinking for the summer if you’re not quite a rose person (like me). This would not be hurt at all by a little chilling before you open it.

Chamlija Kalecik Karası 2015

My visit last year to Chamlija’s tasting restaurant near Kırklareli in Turkey’s Thracian wine region was more of a “flying” visit than anything else. However while there I discovered that Chamlija has a much larger range of wines that I was seeing in Istanbul; including the Chamlija Kalecik Karası. 

Since my visit last summer more and more Chamlija wines are easily available in Istanbul. La Cave in Cihangir has an entire wall section for their stock now. And I believe that the Chamlija Kalecik Karası is one of them.

Chamlija Kalecik Karası

Tasting notes 2015 Chamlija Kalecik Karası:

Chamlija’s Kalecik Karası was treated with French oak for six months and will age well for about 10 years. While the oak treatment was not extensive, it really heightened the inherent aromas of the grape. The nose was really quite lovely-black cherry, forest fruits, and chocolate.

On the palate the Chamlija Kalecik Karası showed a lot of earthiness which I didn’t expect at all. My experience with this grape previously has been more of the light weight and bright fruits variety. At 13.5% abv this had a solid, medium body with light tannins. And while it didn’t have much in the way of a finish, the flavors of mulberry, blackberry, and chocolate were quite lovely.

This would probably go really well with tomato-based foods. For whatever reason that I don’t understand, high acid wines want high acid food so tomato-based sauces and pizza would pair really well this!

Kindzmarauli Marani Kisi 2013

This Kindzmarauli Marani Kisi 2013 was part of the loot I brought home from Georgia in October. It was a duty free purchase I made before boarding. I remember that I had an awful migraine when I left Georgia. I was in pain, nauseated, and miserable. To add insult to injury, there’s a dedicated wine store in the Tbilisi airport and they offer wine tastings. I had to content myself with at least buying a couple wines as I was too ill to taste any.

Georgian loot

Kisi is a native Georgian grape grown largely in the Kakheti region of eastern Georgia. As with many grapes, winemakers in Georgia use both traditional Georgian and European methods when vinifying Kisi.

KMac and I saw a fair amount of Kisi wines during our trip but never got around to trying any. It seemed liked a good idea then to pick one up in duty free. I ended up with some of the heaviest hand luggage I’ve ever hauled around. I had a backpack stuffed with a 3 kilo book (that’s right, a book that weighs 3 kilos) and 3 to 4 kilos of cheese. My hand bag held my camera equipment, various electronic, spices, possibly more cheese, and anything else that wouldn’t fit between the wine bottles in my check bag. To which I managed to shove in the two bottles I bought in duty free.

Kindzmarauli Marani Kisi

Kindzmarauli Marani Kisi 2013 Tasting Notes:

Kindzmarauli Marani makes its Kisi in the traditional Georgian style-in qvevri. The 2013 is a nice, medium-bodied wine with 12.5% abv and would pair well with lighter foods or served as an aperitif.

In the glass the Kisi was a dark, golden straw color. The nose was full of lychee, tropical fruits, citrus, and herbs; possibly also some pine. On the palate it was creamy and slightly thick feeling. The flavor was fainter than the nose but I got some of the citrus flavors and a mineral finish.

The 2010 Paşaeli 6N

I found this post buried in my drafts folder. I think it’s from last winter so color me embarrassed! Regardless of my embarrassment the 2010 Paşaeli 6N is too good to not post. This Karasakız, Merlot, Petit Verdot blend is a gorgeous example of how right a blend of native Turkish and Old World grapes can go.

Paşaeli 6N

Before we get into the notes lets talk about the name. What’s in a name? A political statement in this case! I’ve wondered about the name of this wine since the very first time I tried it and it was only recently that I learned the story behind it. So I guess it was actually fate and not laziness that kept this from getting posted back when I originally wrote it.

Gold was found in the Kas mountains here in Turkey. Of course, with no thought to the environmental impact or the major disruptions it would cause people living there the government handed out contracts to people who quickly got to work destroying the environment. The Turkish word for ‘gold’ is altın. The word for ‘six’ is altı so the numeral 6 followed by an ‘n’ when said together is a word play that sounds like the Turkish word for gold. That combined with the big red slash creates a wine taking a political stance: no gold.

Paşaeli 6N

Tasting notes 2010 Paşaeli 6N:

After only six months in French oak this Paşaeli 6N blend managed to soak up a fair amount of oaky goodness.The nose was deep and intense, full of dark fruits like black cherries and plums, dried herbs, and smoke. On the palate there were velvety tannins with well-balanced acid and a gorgeous, long finish. In the flavors I detected tart, forest fruits and chocolate to balance the smoke and herbs on the nose.

So so beautiful. In general I have liked the Paşaeli wines I’ve tried but for me, the Paşaeli 6N is by far the best. Paşaeli produces quite a few wines and yet they somehow remain rather difficult to get your hands on here in Istanbul but they’re usually worth the effort it takes to hunt them down. And sadly I haven’t seen the 6N recently at all. If anyone knows where I can get another please let me know!

Corvus winery

Bozcaada: Corvus 2012 Vinium

My adventure at Suvla was only a small part of my recent trip. I was invited with my friend T to visit some friends of hers (happily now also of mine) at their beautiful home, Lavender Breeze Farm on the island of Bozcaada where we visited the Corvus and Talay winemakers.

We were invited to stay in The Priest’s House, a beautiful house they’ve rebuilt on their property which they rent out on AirBnB (check out the link!). Look at these rooms! T and I were prepared to stay forever.

Priest's House

Priest's House

Priest's House

I found it a unique house in that the living room/kitchen and both bedrooms were independent from each other. Both bedrooms have their own en suite bathroom and independent entrances out onto the porch.

Priest's House

Priest's House

And did I mention that the porch overlooks some of their vineyards?

With our hosts at Lavender Breeze Farm I had the opportunity to learn about traditional vine growing on Bozcaada. Grapes have been growing on Bozcaada since just about forever. Also known by its Greek name, Tenedos, Bozcaada is in the northeastern part of the Aegean near the entrance to the Dardanelles. Not only does it have a long history, it’s firmly rooted in mythology and classical Greek literature, making an appearance in both Homer’s Iliad and Virgil’s Aeneid.

Bozcaada vineyard

Bozcaada vineyard

Grapes have been growing here for about that long and while none of the vines can lay claim to that much history, if Bozcaada wine makers were to talk about ‘old vine’ wines (which sadly isn’t a trend in Turkish wine making) they would certainly have bragging rights with vines aged 40, 50, even 100+ years old.

Bozcaada vineyard

Bozcaada vineyard

Bozcaada vineyard

Many vines are trellised trained now but some vineyards, like Lavender Breeze Farm and Talay still use the traditional island goblet style in which vines are not attached to trellises but two to three cordons (i.e. branches) are trained to grow out and up from the trunk in such a way as to resemble a goblet.

Corvus winery

Corvus winery

A day spent among the vines wouldn’t be complete without a tasting! While I didn’t have the chance to visit the Corvus vineyard we did stop in at the winery’s restaurant for a tasting. Corvus, which is Latin for ‘crow’, was named for the many crows that make the island their home. They’re more numerous than the people I think. Due to the owner’s clever marketing, Corvus is a very popular wine brand here in Turkey; its never been my favorite but I enjoyed the opportunity to try several of their wines I wouldn’t normally have bought.

Bozcaada beach

Bozcaada beach

And of course we couldn’t go to Bozcaada and not enjoy the beach! We took a break from hiking through vineyards and wine tasting to relax on one of Bozcaada’s beaches. Even though it was about 38C during our entire visit it luckily never felt that hot, not even on the beach, because there are such strong winds on the island. So while I did not take a swim I was able to stay cool and relaxed under the shade with my book.

Corvus wine

As it happens, one of the wines I tasted at Corvus Wine & Bite on Bozcaada I have had on my wine rack since forever. So when I got home from my island getaway I opened it right up.

Vinium is made from Karalahana which is a native Turkish grape and if you can find any information about it online please let me know because I for sure couldn’t. In the glass it’s an opaque cherry red indicating a medium bodied wine. The nose was very fruit forward with red fruits, particularly cherry, and I think some oaky elements. On the palate there were noticeable tannins, unfortunately they didn’t stick around to be appreciated. It has a short, dry finish with lots of juicy, tart cherry flavors.

Not bad, not my favorite.

More on my short Bozcaada adventure and the wines I discovered there coming soon!

Suvla tasting

A Visit to Suvla Winery!

I recently had the opportunity to spend time on Bozcaada and was able to visit the Suvla winery in Ecebat. First of all, I wish I’d realized years ago how easy it is to get to the Suvla winery. The main reason I don’t visit Turkish wineries is because I don’t drive and it’s not like they’re exactly conveniently located. Suvla, in Eceabat, is a short ferry ride away from Canakkale which in turn is serviced by a daily flight out of Sabiha Gokcen airport in Istanbul. Had I but known!

Walking into Suvla was a little, as my friend put it, like arriving at the mother ship. The Suvla store in Ecebat is gorgeous. I approached the wine filled walls like an eager kid in a candy shop wishing I could take a little of everything with me. Thanks to Nusret in the Cihangir Suvla shop we were armed with the name of someone to help us during out visit. Unfortunately after arriving we learned that was her day off! However as proof of how fantastic Suvla is, someone called her and Ecem very kindly came in to provide us with some VIP treatment!

First we had a tour of the factory with one of Suvla’s new wine makers, Hıkmet. He toured us through the factory showing us the grape presses and fermentation tanks (I particularly liked the Dalek-shaped tank in the back) answering my pesty questions all the while. Then he took us into the barrel storage room, a blessedly cool contrast to Eceabat’s 38C heat! Suvla uses oak from France, America, and Hungary I believe he said and the barrels are used for five or so wines before being retired.

Of course we couldn’t be at the home of Suvla and not do some wine tasting! Unfortunately Turkish laws have made it difficult, if not downright impossible, for wineries and shops to provide tastings free of charge, however the Suvla restaurant offers a long list of flights for tasting at reasonable prices as well tastings by the glass. T and I got two different red flights, one from Suvla’s mid priced range of wines and one from the higher end. While I was not surprised that we both loved the Petit Verdot-Karasakız blend; I was shocked, and not a small amount horrified, that I actually kind of liked the (2014) Merlot!

After our tasting and tour of the şaraphane, we refreshed ourselves with a coffee break before heading out for a tour of the vineyards with Suvla’s Australian viticulturist, Mark.

red globe table grapes

I suppose it’s possible that I could have been more excited by this, but not a whole lot. The first thing I learned which was very different for me was that wineries in Turkey don’t own large tracts of land where all the grapes are planted. They have bits of land here and there which enable them to plant different grapes in different types of soils and conditions. As a result, driving between the various Suvla plots we also passed a few individually owned farm plots as well as some of Doluca’s vineyards.

Sad stressed grapes

Suvla plants more than just wine grapes in its vineyards. They also have large sections dedicated to different table grapes that are used in workers’ lunches and farm plots where they grow ingredients for the restaurant and the Kilye line of oils, jams, preserves, etc they produce and sell. Mark stopped often so we could roll out of his Range Rover to get an up close view of the various grapes and so I could pester him with questions about canopies, soil types, drainage, grafting, root stock, and harvesting. We also used the stops as opportunities to try the various grapes. A regular grape will never taste as amazing as will a sun-warmed grape plucked from the bunch on the vine.

A young vine grafted onto American rootstock
Looking over Suvla’s vineyards

After a few hours in the vineyards Mark asked if we’d ever been to Gallipoli and seen the war memorials there. T has been but I’d never been to this part of Turkey at all so he very kindly offered to drive us around on a tour of the area.

Ari Burnu Cemetery

While most of the graves in the Ari Burnu cemetery face the sea, three graves belonging to British Indian Muslim soldiers have their headstones pointing towards Mecca.

Atatürk’s ‘Johnnies and Mehmets’ speech memorial at Anzac Cove

Find Atatürk’s iconic speech here.

Kemekli (bone) beach

As an American the battles at Gallipoli and along the coast now known as Kemekli Beach hold less significance. In fact I dare say that we mostly know it as the unpronounceable Mel Gibson movie. However for the allied armies, particularly Australia and New Zealand, it was an unwinnable blood bath into which Winston Churchill pushed soldiers even while knowing he couldn’t win. Significantly for Turkey, it’s also where a young officer names Mustafa Kemal would distinguish himself and what would begin his path to becoming the father of modern Turkey.

We cannot end this on a melancholy note and of course there must be more wine! So let’s talk about two of Suvla’s wines.

We’ll begin with one that I bought a while ago at the shop in Cihangir. I keep trying the pink wines even though I really just can’t get behind them. In the glass Suvla’s 2015 Merlot, Karasakız Rose is the soft peachy-pink of a sunset. To me the nose was basically pink oak. I did however also get some summer berry and floral scents. On the palate it’s dry with crisp acidity and a decent finish. Not a long one, but it stays with you. There are some nice raspberry and strawberry flavors which normally I love in a wine but the Merlotness of it overwhelmed me.

For 45TL this is not a bad investment and I really think the only reason I didn’t like it is because I just really don’t like the pink wines. However if you don’t share my pink prejudice this would be perfect on a hot summer day!

While actually at the Suvla winery I treated myself to two of the high-end wines that I normally wouldn’t let myself buy in the shop. In fact I’ve managed to forget the cost of them both but suffice to say they’re priced over 100TL/bottle. Really rather somewhat over actually. I am a sucker for Turkish Cabernet Sauvignon though and I really wanted to try Suvla’s award-winning 2012 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon. Unless you have a disposable income far greater than my own, this is not an everyday wine but a special occasion wine. My special occasion happened to be last Tuesday when I made a particularly good truffled chicken and parmesan panino…

After 12 months in oak this gorgeous deep red Cabernet has a nose redolent with prunes, blackberry, cherry, chocolate, and tobacco. In the mouth the tannins are velvety and luscious and the wine has a long finish with more of those dark fruits, some coffee, and smokey flavors. Wow. If you’re looking to treat yourself to a premium Turkish wine you can stop here. I might not have liked the rose but this one knocked my socks off. So much so that I’m actually letting that previous sentence end with a preposition.

Two years after I began my love affair with Suvla wines I finally visited the winery and it could not have been a more fantastic experience! Thank you to Suvla, especially Nusret, Ecem, Hıkmet, and Mike for a fantastic day!

Anfora blush

Anfora 2014 Kalecik Karası Shiraz Blush

While I still approach pink wines warily I am more open to at least trying then than I used to be. That does not mean that I go out of my way to buy them; particularly not the cheaper brands like Anfora.

I have recently started holding Turkish wine tastings; informal parties at my place for my friends where the only rules are that you must bring a wine that is Turkish and is not DLC. If you don’t live here and you don’t know what DLC is count yourself lucky. As one of the goals of the tasting is to try a wide spectrum of Turkish wines at least one pink wine should make the roster.  At the very first tasting I did, the pink wine was Anfora 2014 Kalecik Karası-Shiraz Blush from Pamukkale.

Pale peachy pink in the glass the nose is very fruit forward with a lot of strawberries. On the palate the Anfora blush was off-dry with a subtle acidity and minerality. While I want to be diplomatic and say that while I don’t see this particular blush bringing me any closer to being a fan of pink wines it wasn’t bad…I just can’t say that. I don’t like pink wine-full stop. I have tried and as there are two more bottles in my fridge I will keep trying…but really just avoid this one.

I did not buy this so I cannot confidently say how much it was but my experience with Pamukkale wines said that this Anfora blush was probably around 25TL and widely available at many of Turkey’s grocery stores if you want a bottle of your very own despite my advice that don’t.

Likya Podalia

The 2012 Likya Podalia

The 2012 Likya Podalia has become my go-to bottle when I take people to Dai Pera – which is my go-to restaurant. It’s a nice medium bodied wine that suits just about any palate and isn’t challenging for people who don’t have a lot of wine experience. Likya Podalia is a Kalecik Karası Malbec blend (75TL from La Cave) which has the added benefit of being both exotic for people who don’t know Turkish wines but also comfortingly familiar.

The nose is fascinating…cotton candy and tobacco all swirled together with raspberry undertones. Sounds a little weird but not uncommon for these wines. Kalecik Karası is known for having cotton candy scents in the nose. On the palate the wine is low on tannins but there’s a lively level of acid, and has a nice, medium-length finish that makes my mouth water like I’ve had something savory. It tastes like savory red berries.

Unfortunately the Likya Podalia did not pair well with my chosen foods, it really overpowered my port salut and did not like the tartness of the green apples. Even though it’s a medium bodied wine it’s got some big flavors and needs stronger flavored foods (like the fantastic mezzes at Dai Pera. So pair this with garlic, tomato, spicy peppers and stronger cheeses like Parmesan.

Even Sherlock is getting into the tasting! Although really she probably just wanted the cheese. Dairy products are not safe around her if left unattended. Thankfully she doesn’t demand a share of the wine too!

I am liking Likya more and more with every bottle I have so I think we’re going to be trying a lot more of these in the coming months!

Suvla Behramlı

2013 Suvla Behramlı

Not even the Suvla shop in Cighangir has the Suvla Behramlı! I found it at the Macro Center in Levent for about 15TL and M got a bottle at the big Migros at Cevahir for 19TL. We must find it closer to home though because it was pretty darn marvelous.

We started our evening with a pricey Vino Dessera and this inexpensive Suvla was so much better. So much better. I was pouring the Vino Dessera for everyone else to avoid drinking it and then plotting how to get more of the Suvla Behramlı for myself. So let’s talk about why it’s so good.

Suvla’s 2013 Behramlı is a big blend starring Cabernet Sauvignon and Karasakız supported by Syrah, Cabernet Franc, and the dreaded Merlot. Cherry red, clear to the rim the nose was full of red forest fruits, maybe some cherry, and baking spices. I suspect this spent at least some time in oak.

‘Wine is Life’ in case you forgot

When I taste wine I usually feel it before I taste it. The Suvla Behramlı is smooth and velvety with medium high tannins, medium acid, and a long finish during which the baking spice flavors really pop. Ont the palate I found the red forest fruits to be more dominate but with a nice spine of those baking spices. We maybe have to field trip a little to get our hands on more of this bottle but it will be worth it.

Before I moved to Turkey I firmly believed that you did not have to spend a lot of money to get a good wine; but then I came here where alcohol and import taxes are insanely high and my median bottle price increased by about 300%. In Turkey where even mediocre wine often costs an arm and a leg Suvla seems be [one of] the only company selling truly great wine at very affordable prices.

Bravo.

Prodom Syrah Kalecik Karası

The 2012 Prodom Syrah Kalecik Karası

The Syrah, Petit Verdot, Cabernet Franc blend is not Prodom’s only red blend. There is also the Prodom Syrah Kalecik Karası blend (also 120TL at La Cave) and, thanks to my awesome neighbor who wanted to do a comparison of the two, I had a chance to try it.

I’m not a huge fan of Syrah in general, or of blends that are majority Syrah, as I find that many of them are too tart for my liking. So I was pleasantly surprised to find enjoying this one from the first sip.

The nose of the Prodom Syrah Kalecik Karası was spice, cherries, red fruit, and something sweet that I couldn’t quite identify, perhaps cotton candy coming through from the Kalecik Karası? Cotton candy as a scent/flavor in wine kind of freaks me out a little. It does not seem like a natural flavor for a grape to have.

Possible cotton candy aside, the flavors on the palate were very nice: blackberries, dark fruits, clove, allspice, and a little tobacco. This Prodom is nicely tannic with medium-high acid (I got a little bit of the Coke burn from it) with a long, clean finish.

It did mellow nicely so eventually that Coke burn went away. I think I’ve mentioned before that I’m usually too impatient to let a wine breathe for more than a count of 10 so that’s quite likely why I was getting the Coke affect.

While we opened both bottles that evening we never did get around to doing a proper comparison. One bottle was probably enough but caution was thrown to the winds and we opened the other bottle anyway. Unfortunately my neighbor was already three sheets to those winds so actual comparing didn’t happen. We’re going to give ourselves a second chance at the comparison sometime this winter when he returns to Istanbul. While I remember being surprised by how much I liked this Prodom Syrah Kalecik Karası I now don’t remember which one I liked more! And since the Turkish Lira is once again gaining ground (good for Turkey if bad for me) I’m less willing to run around buying 120TL bottles of wine willy nilly.