Category Archives: Papaskarası

Chamlija Blanc de Noirs Fume

In the semi-recent past I lead a tasting called the Four Faces of Papaskarası. We tasted four of Chamlija’s Papaskarası wines: the Blanc de Noirs, Blanc de Noirs Fume, Papaskarası, and Papaskarası Reserve. I’ve had the Blanc de Noirs before but this was my first go round with the Chamlija Blanc de Noirs Fume. It was not only my favorite of the night but everyone’s favorite!

I often feel spoiled as there are a number of wineries that ship directly to me; Chamlija being one of them. However there are a couple Chamlija wines for which I would pay the inflated retail price. The Blanc de Noirs Fume is one of them.

Chamlija Papaskarası

Papaskarası’s story is interesting. Papaskarası is a grape native to Turkey’s Thracian region with a history going back at least 1,500 years. It is not a well-known grape even in Turkey where it’s cultivated by few winemakers-namely Chamlija, Melen, and Edrine. Papaskarası grapes have the ability to make versatile wines that are aromatic, fruit-forward, and naturally highly acidic light bodied red wines and blanc de noir white wines.

Chamlija Blanc de Noirs Fume

Chamlija Blanc de Noirs Fume 2015 Tasting Notes:

I was really surprised by how light this was for a fume. You can see even in the picture how pale yellow the wine was. Even though I’d had the Blanc de Noirs before I really had no idea what to expect from the Fume. The differences were somehow both subtle and huge.

The nose of the Fume was full of white peaches, tropical fruits, and vanilla. In the mouth it was delightful. Absolutely delightful. Very nice acidity; fresh and lively. The flavors echoed the nose with more white peaches, tropical fruits (mango), and a hint of cream and butter.

At 12.5% abv and the refreshing flavors this was one of those wines that I call Dangerously Drinkable.  It slipped down very easily (perhaps too easily!) especially paired with the spicy chipotle chicken salad I was eating.

I see another order to Chamlija in my near future to stock up on this for summer drinking!

Visiting Edrine Winery

In February at the Sommelier’s Selection Turkey event I discovered several wineries of which I was previously unaware. One of those was the Edrine Winery. I was lucky enough to meet one of the family, Demir, and their brand ambassador Ali who invited me and my friend K to visit.

Edirne wines

Located in the village of Havsa outside Edirne, Edrine (not to be confused with Edirne!) is a family run winery. Founded in 2007 their first vintage came out in 2010. What started as a boutique winery has expanded rapidly and Edrine now produces some 2 million liters of wine annually. The owners, the Öktem family, concentrate on creating quality and affordable wines. Affordable they are! The average price per bottle is 20 TL. Quality? We shall see.

Unfortunately it was raining heavily the day we visited so we weren’t able to visit the vineyards. Instead we were treated to an amazing paired tasting at the Edrine restaurant. They have their own butcher and raise their own animals. They make the best sucuk (Turkish sausage) I have ever had. Ever.

Edirne wines

Edrine produces several lines. The main label is the vineyard name: Edrine. Under this label they make two whites: Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc and four reds: Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, and Papazkarası. It was the latter, a native Turkish varietal, that originally caught my attention at the Sommelier’s Selection. Very few producers bother with this ancient Thracian grape. Chamlija makes four (two blanc de noirs, a Papazkarası, and a reserve) and Melen and Paşaeli also make a Papazkarası.

Edrine wines

Very BIG tanks!

When we finished tasting our way through their main six wines (notes below!) it was time for the winery tour. Because at Edrine they believe strongly in the flavor of the “naked” grape they use very little oak. In fact they have one oak barrique but it sits sadly in the corner. There is no Patrick Swayze here to dance with Baby. At most they add oak chips for a few days. Otherwise everything is aged in steel.

Edrine wines

After the generous pours in the formal tasting we tasted all the wines again; this time directly from the tank. Everything we tried was from Edrine’s 2016 vintage; they have nothing left from 2015 or earlier.

Edrine wines

Then it was up to the slightly damp and chilly deck for more wine. This time Ali broke out the good glasses from Zalto. I have never held a glass more perfect and delicate than these. I was terrified that just by holding it would I snap the stem. These need to be in my life. Although at about 45 Euro per glass this is not an investment to make willy nilly.

Edrine wines

Edrine Tasting Notes (the reds):

Edrine 2016 Merlot: Fresh and fruity with slightly rough tannins, elevated acid, and a short finish. This 14% abv wine has seen no oak so the black fruit flavors of blueberry and mulberry are completely grape-driven.

Edrine 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon: The Cabernet was oddly sweet even though the wine has less than 1 gram of sugar per liter. Treated with oak chips for just five days there is a slight influence in the flavor. However the black currant/cassis flavors typical of Cabernet grapes were very much at the forefront with some cedar and cocoa in the back. Tannins were quite grippy. The odd sweetness of this Cabernet makes it an excellent pairing for lamb though.

Edrine 2016 Papazkarası: Loved. Edrine’s Papazkarası is a very special wine. A friend of mine said that you can’t really say what is a “typical” Papazkarası because no one really knows. But of those I’ve had in Turkey Edrine’s is how I’m setting my standard now. It was surprisingly tannic, although not on the same level as the Merlot or Cabernet. Compared however to other Papazkarası wines I’ve had I wasn’t expecting the tannin. It was also very pepper in both the nose and on the palate with a light, juicy finish.

Edrine 2016 Shiraz: The Shiraz had 10 days of oak chip treatment giving it a slightly sweet flavor of baking spices. However like the Merlot and Cabernet it was very fruit driven, particularly blue fruits. The tannins were pretty chewy and therefore right up my alley. This they paired for us with their own sucuk and it was a match made in Heaven.

Final notes: Edrine should be pretty proud of what they’re doing here. Each of the wines we tried (more reviews about those later!) was easy and enjoyable to drink. And if you can get these for the vineyard price they’ll set you back a whole 20-22 TL (+VAT).

Chamlija Papaskarası

The 2014 Chamlija Papaskarası

How much do I love Chamlija? A whole lot in case that rhetorical question wasn’t obvious and the Chamlija Papaskarası is no exception.

I’d never heard of the Papaskarası grape before seeing this bottle at La Cave (65 TL). It’s a very old grape varietal, it’s been around for some 1,500 years. The “forgotten king of Thracian grapes” produces a table-style wine similar to Pinot Noir and traces likely roots (haha see what I did there?) to Prokupac grapes which have been grown in Serbia and Macedonia since the 5th century.

The nose on the Chamlija Papaskarası was very promising, cherry, plum, forest berries, I think I got a little dried rose towards the top of the glass. I’m guessing this probably hasn’t spent much or any time in oak as I did not detect a great deal of spice. The longer I swirled the more one scent rose to the top: chocolate covered cherries.

The first sip was unexpectedly tart; somewhat shockingly so. I was not expecting that at all. Happily after the initial sip the rest went down much more smoothly to reveal (sour) cherries, young plums, a ribbon of spice. There were no tannins to speak of but a fairly high amount of acid which is likely why it was so tart. It felt very silky in the mouth and once I got accustomed to all the acid it was really lovely.

Chamlija also makes a reserve Papaskarası. I haven’t yet had the pleasure but I suspect that it’s fantastic.