Category Archives: T

Villa Antonori Bianca 2015

I love Italian wine. Red or white. I don’t care. I love it all. And when you find a trusted producer, like Marchesi Antinori, you are guaranteed that even the lower end wines will be nice. Such is the case of the Villa Antinori Bianca 2015.

The Villa Antonori Bianca is a Tuscan wine. A white Tuscan wine! Surely not! Surely yes! Tuscany is not just about red wines. The red wines might be more well-known but there is no shortage of white wine in Tuscany.

Villa Antonori Bianca

Marchesi Antinori is the famed producer of Tignanello-the herald and (still) standard bearer of Super Tuscan wines. Antonori produces far more than Super Tuscans though; and they’ve been doing it for 26 generations. They have eight estates producing wine in both the Toscana and Umbria IGTs (Indicazione Geografica Tipica), three DOCs (Denominazione di Origine Controllata), and three DOCGs (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita).

Antinori produces many high-end wines and are lauded, rightfully, for their excellence. It’s so nice to know that the same sense of excellence and commitment to quality extends to all their wines. The Villa Antinori Bianca being included.

Villa Antonori Bianca

Villa Antonori Bianca 2015 Tasting Notes:

The Villa Antonori Bianca is a testament to a master blender. The wine is a blend of five grapes: Pinot Grigio, Pinot Blanc, Trebbiano, Malvasia Toscana, and Rhine Riesling. How a body is supposed to be able to pick out all those grapes is beyond my comprehension.

Straw yellow with faint green highlights the wine is full of light and life in the glass and the nose. The nose is aromatic; brimming with flowers and citrus. Flavors of lemon and grapefruit wrap around a highly acidic core. The acid was something of a surprise after the delicate nose but it was perfect for cutting through the saltiness of what we were eating.

It’s a lovely wine perfect for pairing or sipping on a hot day.

Telavi Marani Tvishi 2013

This Telavi Wine Cellar Marani Tvishi was another great find at Rind. And worth every penny of the 70ish TL that I paid. Telavi Wine Cellar’s wine are the most available Georgian wines available in Istanbul. Except right now. As I write this I am impatiently waiting for Rind’s order to arrive. The order they put in over a month ago.

But back to the Marani Tvishi!

Marani Tvishi

Under the Telavi Wine Cellar company, Marani is one of the largest wineries in Georgia. It’s also one of the most helpful websites. Not only does it list all the Marani wines being produced but provides tasting notes. Which, coming from Turkey where there are laws against that (which seem to be followed only sometimes?) is really refreshing.

One of the things I find interesting about Georgian wine is their labeling. Old World wines are labeled by appellation; New World by grape type. Georgia seems to use a mix of the two. The Marani Tvishi falls under the Old World labeling example. Tvishi is not a grape but a Specific Viticulture Area (SVA). Specifically one located in Racha-Lechkhumi, Svaneti. The Marani Tvishi which is in fact made from 100% Tsolikauri, is part of the winery’s Appellation Range. It differs greatly from the Marani Tsolikauri that is part of the Regional Range.

It’s enough to make your head spin! Marani’s website lists 55 wines; including two icewines, four chachas, and five brandies. The next time I do more than just run over to Tbilisi for a weekend I am making an appointment with Marani and tasting everything.

Marani Tvishi

Telavi Marani Tvishi 2013 Tasting Notes:

Probably not all that much of a spoiler but I really liked this one. I am kind of a sucker for semi-sweet wines. I actually didn’t know when I opened this that it was a semi-sweet. Because it was though it was an accidentally excellent pairing with the Thai green curry dish E and I drank it with!

One of the things I love so much about semi-sweet whites is how refreshing they are. They’re not the cloying, saccharine dessert wines many assume them to be. They’re lightly sweet and usually low in alcohol (11% in this case) making them excellent quaffing wines. The Marani Tvishi was no different!

A brilliant pale yellow with green highlights in the glass, the Marani Tvishi is beautiful from the off. The nose is slightly sweet with tropical, apricot, and honeysuckle notes. In the mouth it’s light with lively and zesty acid and flavors of quince, apricot, and honeysuckle.

A truly enjoyable wine. The Marani Tvishi has, if you’ll forgive the paraphrase, ‘wet’ my appetite for more wines by Marani!

Smyrna

Smyrna Sauvignon Blanc Trebbiano 2014

The Smyrna Sauvignon Blanc Trebbiano I picked up a Carrefour not too long ago. I’ve never tried any of Smyrna’s wines and since summer is still on and I needed more whites I figured why not. This was a good decision.

I always hesitate a little over Sauvignon Blancs never knowing if I’m going to get something that’s on the herby and green pepper end of the scale (which I do not like) or the riper peachy and fruity end of the scale (which I do like). Because wine roulette is not my favorite game, despite how often I seem to play it here, I was thrilled when I detected lost of fruit in the Smyrna  nose including: peach, pear,  and citrus. It was also a little floral versus the herbaceous nose early harvested Sauvignon Blancs display.

On the palate the Smyrna was soft but with a zesty spark of acid. I didn’t get any of the green herbal flavors often found in Sauvignon Blanc; rather it’s a nice accessible wine with lingering flavors of tropical fruits, peach, and white flowers. Sure it’s not winning any gold medals any time soon but I don’t always need or want something that I feel like I have to mull over every sip. For 30-something TL at Carrefour I am happy to have a wine every once in a while that I can just drink and enjoy with my dried fruits and apples/goat cheese/honey and not worry about having deep thoughts while I’m drinking it.

This is my white wine comfort zone: fruity (particularly those peach and tropical favors), no noticeable oak, medium-low acid. I want to like some of those heftier, oakier whites*, like last week’s Son of Mirkwood; I just…don’t.

*Except Chardonnay. Why someone wants to ruin a perfectly nice wine like Chardonnay by aging it in oak instead of steel is beyond me. But to each his own.